"

Robin Williams didn’t die from suicide. I only just heard the sad, sad news of Robin Williams’s death. My wife sent me a message to tell me he had died, and, when I asked her what he died from, she told me something that nobody in the news seems to be talking about.

When people die from cancer, their cause of death can be various horrible things – seizure, stroke, pneumonia – and when someone dies after battling cancer, and people ask “How did they die?”, you never hear anyone say “pulmonary embolism”, the answer is always “cancer”. A Pulmonary Embolism can be the final cause of death with some cancers, but when a friend of mine died from cancer, he died from cancer. That was it. And when I asked my wife what Robin Williams died from, she, very wisely, replied “Depression”.

The word “suicide” gives many people the impression that “it was his own decision,” or “he chose to die, whereas most people with cancer fight to live.” And, because Depression is still such a misunderstood condition, you can hardly blame people for not really understanding. Just a quick search on Twitter will show how many people have little sympathy for those who commit suicide…

But, just as a Pulmonary Embolism is a fatal symptom of cancer, suicide is a fatal symptom of Depression. Depression is an illness, not a choice of lifestyle. You can’t just “cheer up” with depression, just as you can’t choose not to have cancer. When someone commits suicide as a result of Depression, they die from Depression – an illness that kills millions each year. It is hard to know exactly how many people actually die from Depression each year because the figures and statistics only seem to show how many people die from “suicide” each year (and you don’t necessarily have to suffer Depression to commit suicide, it’s usually just implied). But considering that one person commits suicide every 14 minutes in the US alone, we clearly need to do more to battle this illness, and the stigmas that continue to surround it. Perhaps Depression might lose some its “it was his own fault” stigma, if we start focussing on the illness, rather than the symptom. Robin Williams didn’t die from suicide. He died from Depression*. It wasn’t his choice to suffer that.

"

musing-moon:

Does anyone know what type of moth this is? Its wingspan was a little over two inches. It looked so pretty chillin’ there on my dead Zinnia 💖

musing-moon:

Does anyone know what type of moth this is? Its wingspan was a little over two inches. It looked so pretty chillin’ there on my dead Zinnia 💖

nikolaecuza:

danosaurs-and-philions:

im a bad person who thinks bad thoughts like ‘ew what is that girl wearing’ and then remember that im supposed to be positive about all things and then think ‘no she can wear what she wants, fuck what other people say damn girl u look fabulous’ and im just a teeny bit hypocritical tbh

I was always taught by my mother, That the first thought that goes through your mind is what you have been conditioned to think. What you think next defines who you are.

nativeoftheearth:

nativeoftheearth.storenvy.com

reverbivore:

Shan Shui

One of my favorite periods in Chinese brush painting that arose during the Song Dynasty (960-1279).  Artist of the discipline enveloped Taoist principles through painting in order to highlight the complexity of the cosmos, and how the repetition in patterns and structure lead to this complexity.

"Shan shui painting is a kind of painting which goes against the common definition of what a painting is. Shan shui painting refutes color, light and shadow and personal brush work. Shan shui painting is not an open window for the viewer’s eye, it is an object for the viewer’s mind. Shan shui painting is more like a vehicle of philosophy."

Ch’eng His (via)

This overarching aim is based in three strict principles in order to achieve true balance and form:

  • Paths:  Pathways should never be straight. They should meander like a stream. This helps deepen the landscape by adding layers. The path can be the river, or a path along it, or the tracing of the sun through the sky over the shoulder of the mountain.  The concept is to never create inorganic patterns, but instead to mimic the patterns that nature creates(via)
  • The Threshold:  The path should lead to a threshold. The threshold is there to embrace you and provide a special welcome. The threshold can be the mountain, or its shadow upon the ground, or its cut into the sky.  The concept is always that a mountain or its boundary must be defined clearly. (via)
  • The Heart: The heart is the focal point of the painting and all elements should lead to it. The heart defines the meaning of the painting. The concept should imply that each painting has a single focal point, and that all the natural lines of the painting direct inwards to this point. (via)

One reason why this form of expression is so appealing to me is that rather than the artists trying to create something out of nothing, or rather create something that is aesthetically ideally superior, the artist relinquishes the vision to the patterns in nature in order to highlight the overwhelming complexity of our reality and the underwhelming place humans are in it’s vastness.  What is thought, in light of the abyssal complexity of the cosmos, is exemplified through the mirror of nature and the outcome is beautifully intricate yet monolithic in it’s stature.

Works:

1)  Li Tang - Wind in Pines Among a Myriad Valleys (1124) An Example of “Axe-Cut” Style brush strokes.  One of my personal favorites of the era. (via)

2)  Fan Kuan - Travelers Among Mountains and Streams (1000-1120)  One of the greatest mountainous monument landscapes.  Considered one of the greatest works of the Discipline. (via)

3)  Li Cheng - A Solitary Temple amid Clearing Peaks (919-967) An example of using diluted ink to create a foggy dreamlike landscape. (via)

4)  Guo Xi - Early Spring (1072)   Highlights the inhuman perspective or a an example of a piece with multiple perspectives called “The Angle of Totality” (via)

urbanoutfitters:

Get out there. (Photo by Jeff Luker)

urbanoutfitters:

Get out there. (Photo by Jeff Luker)